The mission of ASU’s Center for Child Well-Being is to advance child and family well-being. We believe society can collectively overcome challenges and make a difference by ensuring the health and well-being of its children. Drawing upon the expertise of faculty from across ASU's research enterprise, we work to increase resilience among families and to build safer and more vibrant communities for young people.

Resources

FAQ's About CIP2020

*** Regarding COVID-19 (Coronavirus) ***

**** 3/17/2020****

The Children of Incarcerated Parents National Conference is Being Postponed

In light of the most recent recommendations from the CDC, we have decided to postpone the Children of Incarcerated Parents Conference to a date that will be determined at a later time.

It is our hope that many of you will still be able to attend, present, exhibit or sponsor CIP 2020 when we have a firm date for the rescheduled conference. As we future plan for CIP 2020, we will send email updates as information becomes available.

It is our hope that we will be able to proceed with the conference agenda and plans as they currently exist at a future date, but realize that will be dependent upon everyone's schedules and availability.

If you need to cancel your current registration please email childwellbeing@asu.edu with "Registration Cancellation" in the subject line.

We look forward to the time when we can deliver what was shaping up to be a really fantastic conference.

Promoting Student Well-Being: Free educational modules

Created in partnership with ASU's Sanford Inspire Program, Drs. Judy Krysik and Elizabeth Anthony of ASU's Center for Child Well-Being and School of Social work developed 4 free online educational modules to develop teachers' knowledge of topics related to child welfare and students' broader social context.

  • Identifying Signs of Child Abuse and Neglect
  • Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect
  • Understanding the Impact of Trauma on Students
  • Supporting Trauma-Exposed Students

Read the full article

Reducing state and local costs through Title IV-E partnership

ASU's Center for Child Well-Being provides technical assistance in the assessment of training programs for Title IV-E eligibility, as well as education on opportunities to reduce state and local costs through Title IV-E partnership opportunities.

Check out our tools & reference materials, recent, and upcoming events.

Center for Child Well-Being: Annual Report 2015-16

The Center for Child Well-Being's first annual report highlights achievements in Training & Technical Assistance, Research & Evaluation, and Community Engagement & Strategic Partnerships through June 30, 2016.

ccwb_annual_report_2016.pdf

Response to Youth Trafficking

Judy Krysik led development of a report recently released by The Governor's Office of Youth, Faith and Family together with the Arizona Human Trafficking Council. Arizona Guidelines for Developing a Regional Response to Youth Sex Trafficking is a statewide model that serves as a roadmap for best practices.  

Projects

ASU's Center for Child Well-Being joins the Network Partnership Program of the Children's Wellbeing Initiative. The Initiative, supported by Ashoka Changemakers and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, brings together organizations and individuals who believe that solutions are needed that bridge sectors and communities; and who will contribute to a dynamic, diverse, and collaborative network. Find out more about the initiative here.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children, Youth and Families awarded the funding to Dominique Roe-Sepowitz (right) and Judy Krysik (left). Both are professors and researchers in the School of Social Work, part of the College of Public Programs at Arizona State University. The project will be a collaborative effort involving the ASU Office for Sex Trafficking Research Intervention, the ASU Center for Applied Behavioral Health Policy and the Arizona Department of Child Safety. 

Full Article

Blog

Newest information on our blog regarding trends, current events, and research

Arizona State University, ASU, #1Innovation, Incarceration, children of incarcerated parents, BLM, social justice, incarceration rates, incarceration disparity, caring for a child whose parent is incarcerated

Each year it becomes more apparent that in order to tackle issues of incarceration and the impact they have on child well-being, we need to examine incarceration in totality with focus on not just the impact of incarceration, but provide space across disciplines to hold conversations on the carceral state as a whole from disproportionality, systems, race, and economics.

How Are Arizona Youth Living in Out-of-Home Placement Really Doing?
Written by: Julia Hernández, PhD, MSW

Arizona State University, ASU, #1Innovation, Foster Care Awareness Month, Foster Care, Foster Youth,Supporting foster kids, NYTD, DCS, Department of Child safety

What is NYTD?
The National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) is a Federal reporting system designed to track youth and the independent living services they receive from states as they prepare to transition out of the foster care system.

In 1999, Public Law 106-169 established the John H. Chaffee Foster Care Independence Program, providing states with flexible funding for programs that help youth transition from foster care to independence. As a condition of receiving funding, the law requires states to track the services they provide and the outcomes of youth who participate in Chafee funded programs. In 2008, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), the federal agency tasked with overseeing the administration of Chaffee funding, developed NYTD to meet this provision. As part of NYTD, states are required to survey youth in foster care at ages 17, 19, and 21.

Strong Threads
by Irene Burnton,
Professor of Practice
ASU School of Social Work
and the Center for Child Well-Being

Strong Threads is part of our Foster Care Awareness Month Series


Each day we weave our life experiences into a tapestry.  The intricate interplay of contrast results in a masterpiece or a mess – often both.   Strong threads bind the art whereas others that may appear flimsy add creativity and innovation.  How we weave life’s contrasts makes one tapestry a work of art and another a bland fabric.   

Students just graduated from college during a time of unprecedented difficulties caused by Covid 19.  I asked them what led them to not only start their college journey but complete their degree. Most identified the support of family or a special friend.  Several are the first in their family to achieve a college degree.  Kayla Taylor overcame overwhelming circumstances.

May is foster care awareness month.  Over 70% of foster youth dream of going to college, yet only 20% enroll.  Estimates regarding graduation with a four-year degree range from one to 11% (Johnson, 2019).  The threads that run through the life of a foster youth who successfully graduates from college are enormously strong.