The mission of ASU’s Center for Child Well-Being is to advance child and family well-being. We believe society can collectively overcome challenges and make a difference by ensuring the health and well-being of its children. Drawing upon the expertise of faculty from across ASU's research enterprise, we work to increase resilience among families and to build safer and more vibrant communities for young people.

Resources

Promoting Student Well-Being: Free educational modules

Created in partnership with ASU's Sanford Inspire Program, Drs. Judy Krysik and Elizabeth Anthony of ASU's Center for Child Well-Being and School of Social work developed 4 free online educational modules to develop teachers' knowledge of topics related to child welfare and students' broader social context.

  • Identifying Signs of Child Abuse and Neglect
  • Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect
  • Understanding the Impact of Trauma on Students
  • Supporting Trauma-Exposed Students

Read the full article

Reducing state and local costs through Title IV-E partnership

ASU's Center for Child Well-Being provides technical assistance in the assessment of training programs for Title IV-E eligibility, as well as education on opportunities to reduce state and local costs through Title IV-E partnership opportunities.

Check out our tools & reference materials, recent, and upcoming events.

Center for Child Well-Being: Annual Report 2015-16

The Center for Child Well-Being's first annual report highlights achievements in Training & Technical Assistance, Research & Evaluation, and Community Engagement & Strategic Partnerships through June 30, 2016.

ccwb_annual_report_2016.pdf

Response to Youth Trafficking

Judy Krysik led development of a report recently released by The Governor's Office of Youth, Faith and Family together with the Arizona Human Trafficking Council. Arizona Guidelines for Developing a Regional Response to Youth Sex Trafficking is a statewide model that serves as a roadmap for best practices.  

Projects

The 2019 National Children of Incarcerated Parents Conference committee invites you to submit proposals for the 2nd Annual Conference on April 14-17, 2019(limit of two proposal submissions per person). 
The focus of this year's conference is:
Integration Touchpoints: Elevating Voices for Opportunities and Improved Outcomes

Proposals should be submitted to one of three tracks.

1. Connecting children and incarcerated parents through family supportive visits and communication

Join us for Children of Incarcerated Parents Conference 2019

April 14-17, 2019 | Phoenix, Ariz. | Venue: Renaissance Downtown Phoenix Hotel

The National Children of Incarcerated Parents Conference is a unique opportunity to gather, share best practices and engage in action planning. Be a part of plenaries, panels, workshops, and other presentation formats addressing:

The 2017 Arizona KIDS COUNT Data Book analyzes five years of data (2010 - 2015), comparing conditions for kids and families from a difficult economic period during and after the nation slowly emerged form the Great Recession. You can access the 2017 Data Book and state fact sheets here. Arizona data for prior years is also available for many of the indicators highlighted in the report and can be accessed through the KIDS COUNT Data Center. ASU's Center for Child Well-Being assists in the compilation of Arizona data through a sub-contract with Children's Action Alliance. 

Educators and parents across the nation are taking notice of the “mindfulness” wave rushing over academic institutions.

 What is mindfulness?

Mindful.org defines mindfulness as “the basic human ability to be fully present, aware of where we are and what we’re doing, and not overly reactive or overwhelmed by what’s going on around us.”

Something as simple as noticing your breathing can be a challenging task in today’s society. The practice of mindfulness allows for an escape from the distracting, stressful, fast-moving world around us.

Mindfulness allows for a reprieve from outside trauma, an increase in social-emotional development, and improves problem-solving skills. As much as all these benefits aid adults they can also be beneficial to school-aged children.

Robert W. Coleman Elementary, in Baltimore, Maryland, saw mindfulness as a way to empower and support their students. At Coleman Elementary when students misbehave in class or the school yard, they are not sent detention or the principal’s office, they are sent to the school’s meditation room.

The meditation room is lovingly referred to as the “Mindful Moment Room.” Here students take a deep breath and are encouraged to talk about what led to their dismissal from the classroom. The staff members in the room then instruct the students to close their eyes and inhales and exhale deeply for a few moments until they are calm enough to return back to class.

Not only has meditation replaced detention, but it has also become an integral part of Robert W. Coleman Elementary school day. Each day starts and ends with a 15 minute guided mediation. And, although the implementation of mindfulness in the class room hasn’t removed hard ship or stress from children’s lives, it does provide a tool for coping with such difficulties.  

The ASU Center for Child Well-Being is excited to announce their article Social-emotional well-being among youth living in out-of-home-care has been published in Elsevier.   Dr. Judy Krysik, Director of the ASU Center for Child Well-Being, and Dr. Cara Kelly, Researcher at the Center for Child Well-Being authored this article with Dr. Elizabeth K. Anthony, Associate Professor, ASU School of Social Work, who is also listed as the corresponding author of this research publication.  

Attend the National Conference for Incarcerated Parents at the Renaissance Phoenix Downtown

 

Return attendees to the Children of Incarcerated Parent's National Conference will be pleased to learn the ASU Center for Child Well-Being has partnered once again with the Renaissance Phoenix Downtown Hotel to act as host for CIP 2019.

Based on our own experiences, as well as, all of the positive feedback from last year's conference attendees, it was a natural choice to return!

Registration for the conference is now open, and CIP has reserved a block of hotels with a $199/night rate.

Further details regarding the conference can be found below: