The mission of ASU’s Center for Child Well-Being is to advance child and family well-being. We believe society can collectively overcome challenges and make a difference by ensuring the health and well-being of its children. Drawing upon the expertise of faculty from across ASU's research enterprise, we work to increase resilience among families and to build safer and more vibrant communities for young people.

Resources

FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

Q. What dates and times will the conference take place?

A. The National Children of Incarcerated Parents Conference will take place on Wednesdays, April 14th, 21st, and 28th and will start at 8:00 am Arizona time/Pacific Daylight Time Zone (GMT -7)


Q. Do you have a schedule for the conference?
A. The conference will take place on Wednesdays, April 14th, 21st, and 28th. There will be 6 sessions per day. The sessions times will be broken down as follows:  

  • Session 1: 8:00 am – 9:00 am
  • Session 2: 9:15 am – 10:15 am
  • Session 3: 10:30 am – 11:30 am
  • Break 11:30 am – 12:00 pm
  • Session 4: 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
  • Session 5: 1:15 pm – 2:15 pm
  • Session 6: 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

 
Q. What topics will be discussed on which days?

A. Wednesday, April 14, 2021
Practices and Programs – Programs or a promising practice that positively affect children and families prior to incarceration (e.g., at arrest), during incarceration (visits and family camp, parenting, communication), or at release and re-entry.

Wednesday, April 21, 2021
Policy – A look at successful policy at local, state and federal levels.

Wednesday, April 28, 2021
Advocacy – How to help prepare those who are affected to tell their stories to advocate, as well as presentations that provide a roadmap for how to organize and build coalitions, and how to elevate the needs of all communities including those that are disproportionately affected –e.g., Native American, African American and Latinx populations, rural populations.

Promoting Student Well-Being: Free educational modules

Created in partnership with ASU's Sanford Inspire Program, Drs. Judy Krysik and Elizabeth Anthony of ASU's Center for Child Well-Being and School of Social work developed 4 free online educational modules to develop teachers' knowledge of topics related to child welfare and students' broader social context.

  • Identifying Signs of Child Abuse and Neglect
  • Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect
  • Understanding the Impact of Trauma on Students
  • Supporting Trauma-Exposed Students

Read the full article

Reducing state and local costs through Title IV-E partnership

ASU's Center for Child Well-Being provides technical assistance in the assessment of training programs for Title IV-E eligibility, as well as education on opportunities to reduce state and local costs through Title IV-E partnership opportunities.

Check out our tools & reference materials, recent, and upcoming events.

Center for Child Well-Being: Annual Report 2015-16

The Center for Child Well-Being's first annual report highlights achievements in Training & Technical Assistance, Research & Evaluation, and Community Engagement & Strategic Partnerships through June 30, 2016.

ccwb_annual_report_2016.pdf

Response to Youth Trafficking

Judy Krysik led development of a report recently released by The Governor's Office of Youth, Faith and Family together with the Arizona Human Trafficking Council. Arizona Guidelines for Developing a Regional Response to Youth Sex Trafficking is a statewide model that serves as a roadmap for best practices.  

Projects

ASU's Center for Child Well-Being joins the Network Partnership Program of the Children's Wellbeing Initiative. The Initiative, supported by Ashoka Changemakers and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, brings together organizations and individuals who believe that solutions are needed that bridge sectors and communities; and who will contribute to a dynamic, diverse, and collaborative network. Find out more about the initiative here.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children, Youth and Families awarded the funding to Dominique Roe-Sepowitz (right) and Judy Krysik (left). Both are professors and researchers in the School of Social Work, part of the College of Public Programs at Arizona State University. The project will be a collaborative effort involving the ASU Office for Sex Trafficking Research Intervention, the ASU Center for Applied Behavioral Health Policy and the Arizona Department of Child Safety. 

Full Article

Blog

Newest information on our blog regarding trends, current events, and research

Arizona State University, ASU, #1InnovationThe Arizona Department of Child Safety (DCS) and Arizona State University (ASU) established a unique partnership to collect federally required National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) survey data from young people in Arizona. Social work students in a Title IV-E program conducted many of the interviews while learning about the needs of young people who are transition-aged and gaining research skills. This article describes the process of developing and implementing the project and provides recommendations for engaging in child welfare agency and university collaborations to meet federal reporting requirements while advancing knowledge about young people in transition.

PDF icon Read the entire article here

Child Sex Trafficking Report- Maricopa County Collaborative December 2020

Between 2017 and 2020, 291 children in Maricopa County were confirmed victims of child sex trafficking. These disturbing findings are outlined in a report released by the Arizona State University Office of Sex Trafficking Intervention Research, Mercy Care, and the Phoenix Police Department and funded by the Arizona Governor’s Office of Youth, Faith and Family. This report reviews child sex trafficking victims reported to the Maricopa County Child Sex Trafficking Collaborative between 2017 and 2020.

The Maricopa County Child Sex Trafficking Collaborative is a unique community initiative that was developed to serve child victims of sex trafficking through a multidisciplinary and holistic perspective. Details about the victims, how they were referred to the Collaborative, their guardianship, and information about the impact of COVID-19 are included in this report.

Findings include:

How Are Arizona Youth Living in Out-of-Home Placement Really Doing?
Written by: Julia Hernández, PhD, MSW

Arizona State University, ASU, #1Innovation, Foster Care Awareness Month, Foster Care, Foster Youth,Supporting foster kids, NYTD, DCS, Department of Child safety

What is NYTD?
The National Youth in Transition Database (NYTD) is a Federal reporting system designed to track youth and the independent living services they receive from states as they prepare to transition out of the foster care system.

In 1999, Public Law 106-169 established the John H. Chaffee Foster Care Independence Program, providing states with flexible funding for programs that help youth transition from foster care to independence. As a condition of receiving funding, the law requires states to track the services they provide and the outcomes of youth who participate in Chafee funded programs. In 2008, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), the federal agency tasked with overseeing the administration of Chaffee funding, developed NYTD to meet this provision. As part of NYTD, states are required to survey youth in foster care at ages 17, 19, and 21.